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Indonesia – How sleeping in a hammock in the jungle changes your perspective on life Expedition Diaries Indonesia Project Sites 

Indonesia – How sleeping in a hammock in the jungle changes your perspective on life

This blog post was originally posted at: How sleeping in a hammock in the jungle changes your perspective on life Written by and photos courtesy of Anni Walsh I recently returned from the most incredible experience of my life, thanks to Operation Wallacea, an organisation concerned with biodiversity and conservation. A representative for Opwall came to talk at my university and... Read More
Indonesia – The Plastic Problem Conservation Indonesia Opwall News 

Indonesia – The Plastic Problem

Written by and Photos Courtesy of Emma Camp Plastic pollution accounts for 60-80 % of marine litter worldwide that totals approximately 14 billion pounds each year.  Due to ocean gyres, trash will accumulate in massive islands with an example of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch estimated to range in size from 700,000 square kilometers to more than 15,000 square kilometers.... Read More
Indonesia – Tracks and signs in the Buton forest Conservation Indonesia Opwall News 

Indonesia – Tracks and signs in the Buton forest

Written by Tom Martin The forests of Buton Island (the location of our Indonesian terrestrial study site) are home to several species of large endemic mammal. All these mammals remain poorly studied, partly because Wallacean species have been neglected by zoologists generally, but also because they are extremely hard to even observe, let alone study. Their shy nature and the... Read More
Indonesia – Addressing Wallacean shortfall on Buton Island Conservation Indonesia Opwall News 

Indonesia – Addressing Wallacean shortfall on Buton Island

Written by Tom Martin Conservation efforts in tropical ecosystems are frequently hindered by a lack of understanding of these ecosystems. Two major knowledge gaps facing conservation scientists are the fact so many species remain undiscovered and undescribed in the tropics (this is known as ‘Linnean shortfall’ by biogeographers, after Linneaus – the inventor of modern taxonomy) and that the distributions... Read More